Wordscapes Level 5272 Answers

Wordscapes level 5272 in the Inlet Pack category and Wildwood Group subcategory contains 20 words and the letters ABEHNS making it a relatively hard level.
This puzzle 63 extra words make it fun to play.

File pdf for level 5272

The words included in this word game are:
ABS, ASH, BAN, BEE, SEA, SEE, SHE, BAH, BAS, BASE, BEAN, BEEN, EASE, SANE, SEEN, BANE, BASH, ASHEN, SHEEN, BANSHEE.

The extra or bonus words are:
NEE, NEBS, HAE, EHS, BEN, ENE, BES, NEB, NABE, HAN, BEES, SNEE, HES, HANSE, HEN, NAE, SAE, AHS, SAN, HENS, NAB, EANS, BANES, SEN, SEAN, ANS, HAEN, EAN, ENS, HEBEN, ANES, NABES, HAES, ANE, NAES, NESH, SHEBEAN, SENE, SHEN, SNEB, HEBES, NAH, SHA, ESNE, SNAB, BENE, HAS, EEN, BENES, SHEA, HEBE, NAS, ENES, NABS, BANS, SABE, ESE, SHAN, EAS, BEANS, SAB, BENS, SENA.

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Level 5272 Word Definitions - Wordscapes Answers

ABS - The abdominal muscles.

ASH - The solid remains of a fire.

BAN - To summon; call out.

BEE - A flying insect, of the superfamily Apoidea, known for their organised societies, for collecting pollen, and producing wax and honey.

SEA - A large body of salty water. (Major seas are known as oceans.).

SEE - To perceive or detect with the eyes, or as if by sight.

SHE - A female person or animal.

BAH - Expressing contempt, disgust, or bad temper.

BAS - Plural of ba.

BASE - Something from which other things extend; a foundation.

BEAN - The large edible seed of plants of several genera of Fabaceae.

BEEN - Past participle of be.

EASE - The state of being comfortable or free from stress.

SANE - Being in a healthy condition; not deranged; acting rationally; -- regarding the mind.

SEEN - Past participle of see.

BANE - A cause of misery or death; an affliction or curse.

BASH - To strike heavily.

ASHEN - Made from the wood of the ash tree.

SHEEN - Beautiful, good-looking, attractive; radiant; shiny.

BANSHEE - In Irish folklore, a female spirit, usually taking the form of a woman whose mournful wailing warns of an impending death. Originally a fairy woman singing a caoineadh (lament) for recently-deceased members of the O'Grady, the O'Neill, the O'Brien, the O'Connor, and the Kavanagh families, translations into English made a distinction between the banshee and other fairy folk that the original language and original stories do not seem to have, and thus the current image of the banshee.